Privacy, Secure Communications, and Law & Order

Understanding Apple and privacy | iMore.

I’m concerned that there is often a false dichotomy presented between privacy and security:

“It’s vital to understand that privacy and security, while often mentioned together, are not one and the same. Privacy demands security, but security does not demand privacy. Historically, privacy has often been violated in the name of security.”

In this context, I can’t quite tell if the author is talking about “secure communications”, rather than, say, “domestic security”. One could easily say: “(communication) security has often been violated in the name of (domestic) security.”

Perhaps we could define our terms more clearly.

But I still think there’s truth in the article: people’s privacy and communications security is dependent on a certain degree of law and order, yet is often violated in service of that same law and order.

Edit: Copy and paste error. I adapted this from a post to the Cyber101x forums on edX.

Why coming out matters (South Bend mayor)

Yep, he knows what he’s talking about – I could say many of the same things about my life and experiences:
(And he is [or has] a great writer, too!)

“I was well into adulthood before I was prepared to acknowledge the simple fact that I am gay. It took years of struggle and growth for me to recognize that it’s just a fact of life, like having brown hair, and part of who I am.

… I’m not used to viewing this as anyone else’s business.

But it’s clear to me that at a moment like this, being more open about it could do some good. For a local student struggling with her sexuality, it might be helpful for an openly gay mayor to send the message that her community will always have a place for her. And for a conservative resident from a different generation, whose unease with social change is partly rooted in the impression that he doesn’t know anyone gay, perhaps a familiar face can be a reminder that we’re all in this together as a community.

Whenever I’ve come out to friends and family, they’ve made clear that they view this as just a part of who I am. Their response makes it possible to feel judged not by sexual orientation but by the things that we ought to care about most, like the content of our character and the value of our contributions.

Being gay has had no bearing on my job performance in business, in the military, or in my current role as mayor. It makes me no better or worse at handling a spreadsheet, a rifle, a committee meeting, or a hiring decision. …

We’re moving closer to a world in which acceptance is the norm. This kind of social change, considered old news in some parts of the country, is still often divisive around here. But it doesn’t have to be. We’re all finding our way forward, and things will go better if we can manage to do it together. … we have an opportunity to demonstrate how a traditional, religious state like ours can move forward. If different sides steer clear of name-calling and fear-mongering, we can navigate these issues based on what is best about Indiana: values like respect, decency, and support for families — all families.

Like most people, I would like to get married one day and eventually raise a family. I hope that when my children are old enough to understand politics, they will be puzzled that someone like me revealing he is gay was ever considered to be newsworthy. By then, all the relevant laws and court decisions will be seen as steps along the path to equality. But the true compass that will have guided us there will be the basic regard and concern that we have for one another as fellow human beings — based not on categories of politics, orientation, background, status or creed, but on our shared knowledge that the greatest thing any of us has to offer is love.”

South Bend mayor: Why coming out matters – South Bend Tribune

Edit: Changing all posts to “Standard” format, as the other formats look weird in the archive view.

Update 2: Is Australia becoming a Police State?

Religious protesters demanding changes to asylum seeker policy removed from Parliament House – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation).

[Update 2/Corrected: Asylum boat turnbacks: Australia paid people smugglers under former Labor government, as well as under Tony Abbott’s government. Abbott’s government turned them back, Labor didn’t, but both paid them money. Oh dear. Just, oh dear. I can’t even…]

Wow, they kicked them out? For protesting? In the foyer of Australia’s Parliament House? Unbelievable.
[Update: Apparently, the protesters were removed because they weren’t in a “designated protest zone”. That’s pretty petty and controlling, if you ask me. Bet the government sympathisers don’t get removed for bootlicking outside “designated fawning zones”. What, the entire country is a designated praising-the-government zone? I rest my case.]

But you can just walk into Parliament House and take a self-guided tour. I did it with a backpacker friend. We even got to see both Houses of Parliament (they weren’t sitting at the time).

So I can only conclude that they are being kicked out for their opinions. (Or, euphemistically, “causing a disturbance”, or “blocking the walkway.”)

Police state warning.

This is breaking news, so I’m posting it straight away. But that means I’ve burned a blog post I could have used as a buffer later in the week…

Updated: I know Crypto

I’ve been hard at work on:

So today’s update is short, and full of teasers.

Edit: I was in such a hurry, I forgot the post metadata (categories and tags).
Did you know that the NSA kills people based on metadata?



Yes, that’s really it. More to come in future posts.